Nao Bustamante: Soldadera

Small Gallery
May 16 to August 1, 2015
Opening Reception: Saturday, May 16, 4 to 6 p.m.

VPAM presents Soldadera, a multi-media show that marks artist Nao Bustamante’s debut West Coast solo museum exhibition. Soldadera, the Spanish term for female soldier, is the title of this exhibition in which Bustamante creates a variety of projects that re-imagine and re-enact The Mexican Revolution (1910-20) in order to offer rarely considered perspectives of women soldiers.

Soldadera features a video installation work produced during a 2015 artist-in-residence program at University of California, Riverside, as well as displays of re-purposed didactic materials from archival collections. Bustamante’s projects secure the overlooked narrative of the woman fighter into the already existing historical documentations of The Mexican Revolution. According to guest curator, Dr. Jennifer Doyle, “the exhibition allows the audience to enter a conversation about the differences that gender makes to our visions of revolution and social change.”

Nao Bustamante is the 2014-2015 Queer Lab Artist in Residence at UCR. She is Associate Professor of New Media and Live Art at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. A native Californian, she studied New Genres at the San Francisco Art Institute. Bustamante has exhibited, among other locales, at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London; the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Sundance International Film Festival; Outfest International Film Festival; El Museo del Barrio in New York; First International Biennial of Performance DEFORMES in Santiago, Chile; and the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki. In 2013, Bustamante was awarded the CMAS-Benson Latin American Collection Research Fellowship to view materials in preparation for the exhibition.

Artist’s web site: naobustamante.com

The exhibition is guest curated by Jennifer Doyle, Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside. It is supported by Queer Lab at UC Riverside, and by the University of California Institute for Research in the Arts.

    Nao Bustamante, "Tierra y Libertad, Kevlar® 2945", 2011, production still. “Test Shoot,”  Bustamante uses a gun typical of the Mexican Revolution to test the protective strength of her fighting costume. courtesy of the artist

    Nao Bustamante, "Tierra y Libertad, Kevlar® 2945", 2011, production still. “Test Shoot,” Bustamante uses a gun typical of the Mexican Revolution to test the protective strength of her fighting costume. courtesy of the artist